Aphorisms Galore!

Front Page

Aphorisms Galore! lets you Feed Your Wit by browsing, searching, submitting, discussing, and rating aphorisms and witty sayings by famous and not-so-famous people.

Welcome! The computer thought you might be interested in these aphorisms today, taking into account things like their recent popularities, their ratings, and how new they are to the collection:

tiny.ag/1zzynlyn  ·   Fair (439 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

These are not books, lumps of lifeless paper, but minds alive on the shelves.

Gilbert Highet, in Art and Literature

tiny.ag/mydapq7x  ·   Fair (605 ratings)  ·  submitted 1999 by Megan

To accomplish great things, you must not only act but also dream, not only dream but also believe.

Anatole France, in Success and Failure

tiny.ag/kl7xzzq3  ·   Fair (1039 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

An eye for an eye would make the whole world blind.

Mahatma Gandhi, in Vice and Virtue

tiny.ag/koexwc3k  ·   Fair (364 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Man is able to do what he is unable to imagine. His head trails a wake through the galaxy of the absurd.

René Char, in Success and Failure

tiny.ag/yefighwf  ·   Fair (1461 ratings)  ·  submitted 1999

Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.

Robert A. Heinlein, in Men and Women

tiny.ag/vmqykh2c  ·   Fair (1049 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Catch-22 (paperback)

The Lord gave us farmers two strong hands so we could grab as much as we could with both of them.

Joseph Heller, Catch-22, in Work and Recreation

tiny.ag/gvohc8br  ·   Fair (3332 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

In nature, there are neither rewards nor punishments -- there are consequences.

Robert G. Ingersoll, in Altruism and Cynicism

tiny.ag/isf8vo05  ·   Fair (1041 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Delay is preferable to error.

Thomas Jefferson, in Success and Failure

tiny.ag/2ohv3gf8  ·   Fair (403 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

The reward of a thing well done is to have done it.

Ralph Waldo Emerson, in Success and Failure and Work and Recreation

tiny.ag/oqpuijzx  ·   Fair (625 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Hell, there are no rules here -- we're trying to accomplish something.

Thomas Alva Edison, in Work and Recreation

tiny.ag/ajjiywbg  ·   Fair (230 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

It costs to be stupid. The stupider you are, the more it costs.

Sherrill Brown, in Wisdom and Ignorance

tiny.ag/pxnbu4ey  ·   Fair (820 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

A woman is only a woman, but a good cigar is a smoke.

Rudyard Kipling, in Men and Women and Vice and Virtue

tiny.ag/gfpih4lb  ·   Fair (315 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

He who desires, but acts not, breeds pestilence.

William Blake, in Work and Recreation

tiny.ag/asaliq9g  ·   Fair (3066 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

tiny.ag/fed8pqej  ·   Fair (1052 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997 by David Epstein

Disorder increases with time because we measure time in the direction in which disorder increases.

Stephen Hawking, in Science and Religion

tiny.ag/b5zelloy  ·   Fair (531 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Education is a better safeguard of liberty than a standing army.

Edward Everett, in War and Peace and Wisdom and Ignorance

tiny.ag/r3davdhl  ·   Fair (427 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

In war, there is no substitute for victory.

Douglas MacArthur, in War and Peace

tiny.ag/jx4okg6p  ·   Fair (1050 ratings)  ·  submitted 1999 by Michael A. Loduha

When skunks duel, wind direction is everything.

Michael A. Loduha, (on environmental factors in legal cases vs. the attorneys' skills; from a lecture series), in Law and Politics

tiny.ag/fjegbeuo  ·   Fair (1058 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

I think it would be a good idea.

Mahatma Gandhi, (when asked what he thought of Western civilization), in Law and Politics

tiny.ag/8vmi9s0a  ·   Fair (492 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

I call Christianity the one great curse, the one great intrinsic depravity, the one great instinct for revenge for which no expedient is sufficiently poisonous, secret, subterranean, petty -- I call it the one mortal blemish of mankind.

Friedrich Nietzsche, in Science and Religion